Maya Burhanpurkar

BSc Candidate, Computer Science and Physics, Harvard University
Summer Undergraduate Researcher at the Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics

When did your love of STEM begin?

Maya: I think. I've always been really curious. I used to ask my parents questions constantly. Why is the sky blue? How do cars work? Why are there seasons? All sorts of questions like that. I think that eventually I started to ask questions that people didn't have answers to. And that of course lends itself really nicely to the scientific method.

What did you love most about study in your field of STEM?

Maya: I think what I enjoy most about studying science is that you get to ask me most fundamental questions. I mean in physics, in particular, there is there is no more fundamental question you can ask then questions that physicists get to ask on a daily basis. Why is the universe here? How did it get here? What are the particles that make up the smallest possible things in the universe? What are the largest possible things in the universe? I think that these are just such grand and interesting questions to be able to answer those with your own brain is absolutely wild. So I think that's what's really really lovely about science.

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“What I think is really interesting about doing the work that I do has the potential to really really help people in 100 or 200 years.”

What advice would you give to young women considering a career in STEM?

Maya: My advice for a young woman considering a career in STEM would be to pursue your passion aggressively. I think it's depending on what the situation is there. They're all I mean there will always be things that you think are obstacles and roadblocks. But I think it's important to just work as hard as you possibly can and as long as you do that then you'll be able to get around those roadblocks and those obstacles because people will know just how good you are because of how hard you work. So I think that's what my biggest piece of advice would be, to work really, really hard.

About the Calendar

The Calendar showcases twelve young women in different and exciting careers. There's many roads one can go down with a career in STEM, so we wanted to highlight the unique paths each of these women have taken to where they are today. Find out what they did with their STEM education!

Meet the Women

Eugenia Duodu

Eugenia Duodu

Chantel Camara

Chantel Camara

Erica Gibson

Erica Gibson

Nazra Noushad

Nazra Noushad

Mila Maric

Mila Maric

Richelle Rozanski

Richelle Rozanski

Jenan Abderrahman

Jenan Abderrahman

Karol Tinsley

Karol Tinsley

Emily Newton

Emily Newton

Cylita Guy

Cylita Guy

Maya Burhanpurkar

Maya Burhanpurkar

Natlia Malafeeva

Natlia Malafeeva

Find the Calendar

The calendar will be distributed through outreach events for young women in STEM or through various methods with our distribution partners listed below. You may also pick up a copy of the calendar at one of our distribution partner’s events. Browse through the calendar to find out if we’re at an event near you!u!

Current Distribution Partners:

Let’s Talk Science, Technovation Challenge in Canada, Techsploration, Kids Can Press, STEM Kids Rock, Nelson Canada, Girl Guides of Canada, St. Mildred’s-Lightbourn School, Cogeco Peer 1, Women Unlimited Halifax Canadian Apprenticeship Forum, Ontario Science Centre, Toronto District School Board, Life Gears, BMO, CIBC, Deloitte, NRStor Inc., Ernst & Young LLP, RBC, Linamar, Move the Dial, Perimeter Institute.

We are currently taking distribution partners! If you are an organization who would like to distribute the calendar, please submit a request and we will get back to you!